What does spiritualism mean to you?

I was listening to a program this morning and this got me wondering what your thoughts are on the matter.

Is spiritualism religious? What is the difference of spiritualism and spirituality – to you? Or do you think it’s all just subjective hokey?

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Responses

  1. Perhaps it is being prayerful in religion, meditation, and just quietly reflecting within. When Baha’is start talking about spirituality, I inwardly roll my eyes. A year ago, I thought I was going to face cancer and got a talk about “spirituality” and given a book to read that claims to cure cancer by means of singing bowls, candles, incense, and essential oils. I am not interested in such mumbo-jumbo. To me, spirituality comes with quiet reflecting within. I don’t pay attention to anything airy-fairy.

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  2. I find “spiritualism” generally to be Syncretism, where people pick and choose different, often conflicting, beliefs that align with their own heart’s desires and presuppositions.

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    1. @Weenis Do you have any thoughts on the take from @ladybarbara? Lately it seems that spiritualism is being related to an inner self of one’s place in the world/universe and is moving away from religious spirituality that it was often connected to.

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      1. @mamajoy

        It seems the crux of what @ladybarbara stated is-

        spirituality comes with quiet reflecting within

        If that’s the case, that’s generally referred to as meditation, self-reflection, or introspection.

        To call that “spiritualism” is, IMO, redefinition of “spiritualism”. In our post modern age where we hate objective thought and definitions, people decry labels. Within liberal forms of various religions, people shirk the label of their religion and say things like, “I’m not a Christian, I’m spiritual, like Jesus.” Statements like that make no sense.

        Like I said, when people claim to be “spiritual” they use it as a catch-all label to identify their own personal “truths” and belief system to explain the bigger things in life. They pick and choose all these different beliefs and belief systems, and smash them all together because it helps them sleep at night. This truly epitomizes the “religion as a crutch” viewpoint from atheists and god hating philosophers when they full sail lambaste all religious beliefs.

        These “spiritual” people tend to believe in things called “karma”, or the idea that we’re all linked together somehow in this grand cosmic scheme. Other prevalent ideas are that the primary goal in life is to “be a good person”, but without any basis for what “good” even is. Truth is generally subjective, and all people have their own truth. These people believe it’s bad for people to push their truths on others when there is a conflict, because, how can anyone be so certain about anything? Things like “love”, “happiness”, “self-esteem”, and dopamine hits are the measure of success in life. Travel and cultural exposure rate high on this list, because with these experiences people elevate themselves in their thinking and understanding, bringing a sense of peace within one’s self and the universe. People are naturally good, and when people turn out bad it’s because of bad environmental stimulus that put them on an incorrect course. These spiritual people push toxic negativity out of their lives, because having people that are constantly trying to push their truths on you is bad for a healthy mind.

        ^ That’s the typical “spiritual” person. ^

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  3. It’s all subjective. If I were to ask a room of fifty folks to paint a picture representing their thoughts on spirituality, I’d receive fifty different pictures.

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